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Thursday, October 22, 2009

BB: Blue Cheese Souffle

I knew this would be in interesting recipe for me. I don't care much for blue cheese or eggy things, but I was certainly intrigued by the thought of finally attempting a souffle. I also knew that it wouldn't come out perfectly for me, as "over-mix" seems to be my middle name in the kitchen. This time, I actually don't think I overmixed, but since I cut the recipe in half and used a smaller ramekin, I wasn't sure how long to bake. I checked at 25 min and it had risen and was golden brown, so I took it out. On the way to the photo area... yeah. Deflation. The taste was good, just a hint of the blue cheese, but the eggy-ness really isn't my thing. Still, this was a fun adventure in cooking something new. See how the other Barefoot Bloggers fared, here.

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Blue Cheese Soufflé
Source: Barefoot in Paris on page 50
Chosen by Summer of Sexy Apartment




  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing the dish



  • 1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan, plus extra for sprinkling



  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour



  • 1 cup scalded milk



  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper



  • Pinch cayenne pepper



  • Pinch nutmeg



  • 4 extra-large egg yolks, at room temperature



  • 3 ounces good Roquefort cheese, chopped



  • 5 extra-large egg whites, at room temperature



  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar


    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
    2. Butter the inside of an 8-cup souffle dish (7 1/2 inches in diameter and 3 1/4 inches deep) and sprinkle evenly with Parmesan.
    3. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over low heat. With a wooden spoon, stir in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Off the heat, whisk in the hot milk, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, the cayenne, and nutmeg. Cook over low heat, whisking constantly, for 1 minute, until smooth and thick.
    4. Off the heat, while still hot, whisk in the egg yolks, one at a time. Stir in the Roquefort and the 1/4 cup of Parmesan and transfer to a large mixing bowl.
    5. Put the egg whites, cream of tartar, and a pinch of salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on low speed for 1 minute, on medium speed for 1 minute, then finally on high speed until they form firm, glossy peaks.
    6. Whisk 1/4 of the egg whites into the cheese sauce to lighten and then fold in the rest. Pour into the souffle dish, then smooth the top. Draw a large circle on top with the spatula to help the souffle rise evenly, and place in the middle of the oven. Turn the temperature down to 375 degrees F. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes (don't peek!) until puffed and brown. Serve immediately.

    5 comments:

    Bridget said...

    I'm not an expert or anything, especially on this particular recipe, but I'm pretty sure souffles are supposed to deflate. The only souffle I've made that didn't sink was way overbaked.

    Anyway, yeah, the egginess of savory souffles has always been an issue with me too. I think I always expect them to be more cheesy and less eggy. I need to just start thinking of them as puffy flavored eggs.

    Rose said...

    Not deflating souffle? I kind of like this. I made this blue cheese souffle (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Cabrales-Cheese-Souffles-with-Endive-and-Asian-Pear-Salad-109055) and liked it. They are more eggy than cheesy though, you are right!

    mamakrystal said...

    It still looks pretty! I have this on my to-do list for Friday night dinner, I'm still on the fence about making it.

    Kate said...

    Same experience with me! First time making a souffle, I scaled it way back, just took it out when it looked brown, and then it deflated as it I took photographs. It was still very tasty and I enjoyed it, but it's definitely something you need to take out in front of people immediately.

    smellslikehome said...

    your souffle looks perfect!! this recipe didn't win me over either...